The ULEZ has cut the number of dirty vehicles in central London

The Ultra Low Emission Zone has reduced the number of polluting vehicles in central London by more than a third – but as a result it will hit the pockets of Transport for London.

The scheme, which charges polluting vehicles £12.50 a day for entering into the existing Congestion Charge Zone, was launched in April by London Mayor, Sadiq Khan.

Since its introduction, the number of non-compliant vehicles has fallen from 35,578 a day in March, to 23,054 in July – down by by 12,524 per day (35 per cent).

But while emissions will be down, so will revenues, with a forecast from operators expecting TfL income from ULEZ for 2019/20 to drop from £77million to £51million.

ULEZ is working: Figures for July showed that the number of older polluting vehicles used in the zone had fallen 35% compared to March, suggesting ULEZ is having the desired impact While ULEZ might be effectively increasing the health benefits of central London, the success is set to cost TfL £26million in lost revenue A revised forecast sent to London mayor Sadiq Khan from operators said TfL income from ULEZ for 2019/20 is expected drop from £77million to £51million ULEZ was launched on 1 April 2019 and charges polluting vehicles £12.50 a day for entering into the existing Congestion Charge Zone (CCZ) ULEZ was launched on 1 April 2019 and charges polluting vehicles £12.50 a day for entering into the existing Congestion Charge Zone (CCZ)

ULEZ was launched on 1 April 2019 and charges polluting vehicles £12.50 a day for entering into the existing Congestion Charge Zone (CCZ)

Mr Khan said: ‘The figures prove that the ULEZ continues to have a significant impact with 12,500 fewer older, polluting vehicles now coming into the zone compared with March.

‘These older vehicles send harmful emissions into our air and lungs and I will continue to take bold action to protect Londoners from this invisible killer. 

‘It is highly encouraging to see that so many motorists and businesses are helping reduce pollution by driving cleaner vehicles into the zone.’

Tory mayoral rival Shaun Bailey said the proceeds from ULEZ earnings should be ‘ring fenced for air quality schemes’ that benefit Londoners.

Mr Bailey added that he would use the revenue to  fund a new all-electric bus fleet out of the proceeds.

‘The best way to clean up our capital’s air quality is to remove the dirty diesel buses emitting their fumes all over the city,’ he said.

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