Did claiming working tax credit also earn me credits towards the state pension? 

After working steadily since the age of 16, Judie Jancovich was looking forward to retiring on a full state pension.

But she is set to lose about £1,000 a year in retirement income as government guidelines were not properly explained on official forms.

The university lecturer, now 64, is among possibly thousands of women whose names were put down second on joint working tax credit claims — and will not get crucial National Insurance credits towards their pension.

Lost out: Judie Jancovich is set to miss out on about £1,000 a year in retirement income Admin issue: Women whose names were put down second on joint working tax credit claims are losing out Past record: HMRC says Judie did not make enough NI contributions or get enough credits over 14 years Past record: HMRC says Judie did not make enough NI contributions or get enough credits over 14 years

Past record: HMRC says Judie did not make enough NI contributions or get enough credits over 14 years

HMRC says Judie did not make enough NI contributions or get enough credits over 14 years —including seven while making the joint working tax credits claim.

An HMRC spokesman says: ‘HMRC continuously looks to improve its communication products for customers.’

Working tax credit was mainly replaced by universal credit, dealt with by the Department for Work and Pensions. A spokesman says: ‘All eligible adults within a Universal Credit award will receive a National Insurance contribution, which counts towards entitlement to the state pension.’

In June, campaigners took the DWP to court over claims that raising the state pension age discriminated unlawfully against women born in the Fifties. A judgment is expected in September. They argued women were not warned that their retirement age was changing from 60 to 66 and they would lose out.

b.wilkinson@dailymail.co.uk

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